landscaping, Metaverse, second life, virtual world

Round and Round and Bitching About Unthinking People

This morning I drove my two powered wheelchairs round and round for an hour on a circuit in my house. Boring!!! It’s been raining since Monday here so I can’t get outside to do the outside exercise I like to do. Rain and electric powered wheelchairs are not a good mix.

Is exercise really exercise when you need to use an electric powered chair to move any significant distance? Technically I guess not but it does make me feel better. I also try to spend time in virtual worlds to keep my mind active.

Saturday I finally got someone that says he will build a connection from my front emergency ramp to the street. That way out of the house is there in case of fire or power failure. As usual the guy didn’t think when he started working Saturday. He dug out the area at the end of existing ramp leaving a big ten inch pit at the end of the existing ramp then he left. Knowing it was going to rain. It will be like that for at least a week and a half or longer.

That may not sound like much of a drop and rise to someone who can walk but it means I’m trapped if there is a fire or the power goes out. When I pointed this out to him he just shrugged and did nothing.

It’s the same non thinking and uncaring response able bodied people have been giving me for decades. Of course there is the usual taking the handicapped parking place or parking their car in front of the curb cut that allows me to get out of the street then saying “It’s okay, I’ll only be a few minutes.” Guess what I have things to do too and I sure don’t want to be stuck in the middle of the street with the crazy drivers we have today.

Oh I forgot if you are handicapped you are not supposed to complain when someone who can walk treats you like shit. Well it is better than it was. A few years ago someone I knew had to pee in a coffee can at work since he couldn’t get in the bathroom. It’s a good thing he was male.

particle physics

Latest experiment at Large Hadron Collider reports first results

Hadron

CERN

By Massachusetts Institute of Technology

After a two-year hiatus, the Large Hadron Collider, the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, began its second run of experiments in June, smashing together subatomic particles at 13 teraelectronvolts (TeV)—the highest energy ever achieved in a laboratory. Physicists hope that such high-energy collisions may produce completely new particles, and potentially simulate the conditions that were seen in the early universe.

In a paper to appear in the journal Physics Letters B, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reports on the run’s very first particle collisions, and describes what an average collision between two protons looks like at 13 TeV. One of the study leaders is MIT assistant professor of physics Yen-Jie Lee, who leads MIT’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Group, together with physics professors Gunther Roland and Bolek Wyslouch.

In the experimental run, researchers sent two proton beams hurtling in opposite directions around the collider at close to the speed of light. Each beam contained 476 bunches of 100 billion protons, with collisions between protons occurring every 50 nanoseconds. The team analyzed 20 million “snapshots” of the interacting proton beams, and identified 150,000 events containing proton-proton collisions.

For each collision that the researchers identified, they determined the number and angle of particles scattered from the colliding protons. The average proton collision produced about 22 charged particles known as hadrons, which were mainly scattered along the transverse plane, immediately around the main collision point.

Compared with the collider’s first run, at an energy intensity of 7 TeV, the recent experiment at 13 TeV produced 30 percent more particles per collision.

Lee says the results support the theory that higher-energy collisions may increase the chance of finding new particles. The results also provide a precise picture of a typical proton collision—a picture that may help scientists sift through average events looking for atypical particles.

“At this high intensity, we will observe hundreds of millions of collisions each second,” Lee says. “But the problem is, almost all of these collisions are typical background events. You really need to understand the background well, so you can separate it from the signals for new physics effects. Now we’ve prepared ourselves for the potential discovery of new particles.”